Guitar Scales

You may also like:

Sponsored by Google

That would be the Guitar Scales category

Essential Licks

The great guitar solos are perfect musical constructions but they always include memorable licks, small music lines that are impossible to forget and that define the style of the soloist. Here's a suggestion of the most prominent guitar licks. Of course, you can suggest your own preferences.

John Petrucci

The Harmonic-Minor Scale

The next table shows the correspondence between the root of the scale and the fret on the guitar where a certain scale should be played. For instance, if you want to play in the root of A, you should start at the 5th or 17th fret, for the root of C, you should start at the 8th or 20th fret, for the root of Eb, you should start at the 11th fret:

Other Scales

The next table shows the correspondence between the root of the scale and the fret on the guitar where a certain scale should be played. For instance, if you want to play in the root of A, you should start at the 5th or 17th fret, for the root of C, you should start at the 8th or 20th fret, for the root of Eb, you should start at the 11th fret:

Bebop - Blues Practice

The bebop scales differ by only one note with 7-notes scales. The difference is shown by the red bullets:

The next table shows the correspondence between the root of the scale and the fret on the guitar where a certain scale should be played. For instance, if you want to play in the root of A, you should start at the 5th or 17th fret, for the root of C, you should start at the 8th or 20th fret, for the root of Eb, you should start at the 11th fret:

Symmetric Scales

The next table shows the correspondence between the root of the scale and the fret on the guitar where a certain scale should be played. For instance, if you want to play in the root of A, you should start at the 5th or 17th fret, for the root of C, you should start at the 8th or 20th fret, for the root of Eb, you should start at the 11th fret:

Pentatonic and Blues Scales

The simplest scales are the pentatonic ones - they have only 5 notes. The blues scales have 6 notes. "m" stands for minor and "M" stands for major (the difference between a minor scale and its major correspondent - containing the same notes - is three frets. For example, the major correspondent of F#-minor is A-major, the major correspondent of A-minor is C-major). The blue bullets show the note to be added in order to transform a pentatonic scale to a blues one:

Pages