Contemporary Music

Contemporary Music

- In our last conversation [Shred], you didn't seem too fond of contemporary music.
- I had the first class with a young student yesterday and I asked him what he is listening to, in hope to learn something new. The answer was "Beatles, Stones, Jethro Tull". Guys make a lot of excellent new music, maybe more than ever. The problem is it doesn't reach the large audience. And, in relative numbers, its weight is less and less important. The radio and TV stations broadcast only old music and the worst of the new one.
- Why?
- That's what they know to do. The editors are not aware of new music, too. And that's what people ask for. The contemporary life leaves no time and no nerves for new interesting things.
- That's what we call progress?
- Yes. Since the Industrial Revolution in the mid 1700s, people are left less time for themselves. In fact, the real length of life – someone called it "the net life" - is getting shorter. After 12 hours of "work" and stress at the office, who's got enough patience and nerves to hear distorted guitars?
- It doesn't seem "progress" to me.
- Well, that's it. We have to adapt. Progress also took a hard price in the weight of the Audible against the Visual. Even since the introduction of the electric bulb. People see more than they hear. TV and computers boosted this trend. When I ask students to get acquainted to a band or a certain guitar player they go to youtube. They want to see it. Think about contemporary "classic music" (an improper notion – it should be called "written music" or "premeditated music"). Young people even don't know there is such a thing. They only hear it at the movies, where it has a kind of premonitory role. Imagine Johnny Depp walking on a New York street. The background music tells you what's going to happen: will it be something funny, something terrible or you should expect to some action?
- Action? Johnny Depp?
- Let's say the movie is "The Pirates from Crown Heights". The point is people are ready to listen to this kind of music when it's connected to images but they would hate it on the radio or in a concert hall.
- I think you're right. I never attend "classic" concerts.
- You lose. First of all, a real musician should listen to any kind of music. And there is nothing like "classic" music to express feelings. Is there more sensuality than in Wagner's Tristan? Is there more yearning than in Mahler's Adagietto? Is there more anxiety than in Schnittke's Viola Concerto?
- Never heard about – what's his name?
- For a rock guitarist like you are, there may be a lot of inspiration in "classic" music or any other genre. Guitarists may learn a lot about trance, improvisation and phrasing from Coltrane and Miles, for instance.

nike air max 1 Classic