Essential Licks - David Gilmour

David Gilmour's contribution in building the legend called Pink Floyd is immense. His compositions, his voice and his memorable guitar playing are known by millions. His tone, the concept of his solos and their integration in Floyd's music are essential, however we'll take a look at some licks from his most celebrated solos:

Gilmour likes to strike the listeners right from the begining of his solos. Everybody knows Another Brick In the Wall:

Another Brick In the Wall

The MIDI File

And the start of the second solo from Comfortably Numb:

Comfortably Numb

The MIDI File

Gilmour is a blues guitar player, basically. A blues lick from Comfortably Numb:

Comfortably Numb

The MIDI File

In the previous lick, you may have noticed the bend on the fifth (E to #F), a very known blues procedure. Here are repeating bends on the fifths (A to B) from What Do You Want From Me:

What Do You Want From Me

The MIDI File

Gilmour uses blues licks even on acoustic guitar. From Wish You Were Here:

Wish You Were Here

The MIDI File

And a series of bends from Another Brick In the Wall:

Another Brick In the Wall

The MIDI File

Bends in unison from Pigs:

Pigs

The MIDI File

Double-stops are another Gilmour trade-mark. From Money:

Money

The MIDI File

He also uses left-hand muted (dead) notes like in his solo from Have a Cigar:

Have a Cigar

The MIDI File

Fast sweeps (rack) are also memorable for Gilmour's playing. From the first solo in Comfortably Numb:

Comfortably Numb

The MIDI File

Playing in a "progressive" group, Gilmour had to play sometimes solos on complex chord progressions. He did it brilliantly in Dogs:

Dogs

The MIDI File

As mentioned in the beginning, Gilmour's conceiving of the solo is what's really important and should be studied. Here is the poweful Time solo:

Time

The MIDI File

And the sensitive second solo from Shine On You Crazy Diamond:

Shine On You Crazy Diamond

The MIDI File

Category: 
references: